BOLTON WANDERERS F.C.
Founded: 1874


Also Known As:
CHRIST CHURCH (1874-77)
BOLTON WANDERERS (1877-)




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BOLTON WANDERERS F.C. (Football Club)
Included Info: Brief History, Club/Stadium Info, Team Jersey & Much More...

BRIEF HISTORY of BOLTON WANDERERS FOOTBALL CLUB (reproduced from 'Wikipedia' pages)

The club was founded by the Reverend Thomas Ogden, the schoolmaster at Christ Church in 1874 as Christ Church F.C. It was initially run from the church of the same name on Deane Road, Bolton, on the site where the Innovation factory of the University of Bolton now stands. The club left the location following a dispute with the vicar, and changed its name to Bolton Wanderers in 1877. The name was chosen as the club initially had a lot of difficulty finding a permanent ground to play on, having used three venues in its first four years of existence. Bolton were one of the 12 founder members of the Football League, which formed in 1888. In 1894 Bolton reached the final of the FA Cup for the first time, but lost 41 to Notts County at Goodison Park. A decade later they were runners-up a second time, losing 10 to local rivals Manchester City at Crystal Palace on 23 April 1904. The period before and after the First World War was Bolton's most consistent period of top-flight success as measured by league finishes, with the club finishing outside the top 8 of the First Division on only two occasions between 191112 and 192728. In this period Bolton equalled their record finish of third twice, in 192021 and 192425, on the latter occasion missing out on the title by just 3 points (in an era of 2 points for a win). On 28 April 1923, Bolton won their first major trophy in their third final, beating West Ham United 20 in the first ever Wembley FA Cup final.

From 1935 to 1964, Bolton enjoyed an uninterrupted stay in the top flight regarded by fans as a golden era, spearheaded in the 1950s by Nat Lofthouse. On 9 March 1946, the club's home was the scene of the Burnden Park disaster, which at the time was the worst tragedy in British football history. 33 Bolton Wanderers fans were crushed to death, and another 400 injured, in an FA Cup quarter-final second leg tie between Bolton and Stoke City. There was an estimated 67,000-strong crowd crammed in for the game, though other estimates vary widely, with a further 15,000 locked out as it became clear the stadium was full. The disaster led to Moelwyn Hughes's official report, which recommended more rigorous control of crowd sizes. In 1953 Bolton played in one of the most famous FA Cup finals of all time The Stanley Matthews Final of 1953. Bolton lost the game to Blackpool 43 after gaining a 31 lead. Blackpool were victorious thanks to the skills of Matthews and the goals of Stan Mortensen. Bolton Wanderers have not won a major trophy since 1958, when two Lofthouse goals saw them overcome Manchester United in the FA Cup final in front of a 100,000 crowd at Wembley Stadium.[19] The closest they have come to winning a major trophy since then is finishing runners-up in the League Cup, first in 1995 and again in 2004.

While Bolton finished 4th the following season, the next 20 years would prove to be a fallow period. The club suffered relegation to the Second Division in 196364, and were then relegated again to the Third Division for the first time in their history in 197071. This stay in the Third Division lasted just two years before the club were promoted as champions in 197273. Hopes were high at Burnden Park in May 1978 when Bolton sealed the Second Division title and gained promotion to the First Division. However, they only remained there for two seasons before being relegated. The early 1990s saw Bolton gain a giant-killing reputation in cup competitions. In 1993 Bolton beat FA Cup holders Liverpool 20 in a third round replay at Anfield. Bolton also secured promotion to the second tier for the first time since 1983. In 1994 Bolton again beat FA Cup holders, this time in the form of Arsenal, 31 after extra time in a fourth round replay, and went on to reach the quarter-finals, bowing out 10 at home to local rivals (and then Premiership) Oldham Athletic. Bolton also defeated top division opposition in the form of Everton (32) and Aston Villa (10) that year. Bolton reached the Premiership in 1995 thanks to a 43 victory over Reading in the Division One play-off Final. Bolton were relegated on goal difference at the end of the 199798 Premiership campaign. In 2000 Bolton reached the semi-finals of the FA Cup, Worthington Cup and play-offs but lost on penalties to Aston Villa. In 200001 Bolton were promoted back to the Premiership after beating Preston North End 30 in the play-off final. Bolton reached the League Cup final in 2004, but lost 21 to Middlesbrough. Nevertheless, the club finished eighth in the league, at the time the highest finish in their Premiership history.

In 2005 Bolton finished sixth in the league, thus earning qualification for the UEFA Cup for the first time in their history. The following season, they reached the last 32 but were eliminated by French team Marseille as they lost 21 on aggregate. Between 200304 and 200607, Bolton recorded consecutive top-eight finishes, a record of consistency bettered only by the big four of Chelsea, Manchester United, Liverpool and Arsenal. On 13 May 2012, Bolton Wanderers were relegated to the Championship by one point on the last day of the season after drawing 22 with Stoke City, with Stoke scoring a controversial opener in which former player Jon Walters appeared to push goalkeeper Adam Bogdan into the net, and then a questionable penalty.


CLUB FACTS & INFORMATION

Official Name
--
Bolton Wanderers F.C.
Club Nickname
--
The Trotters
Year Founded
--
1874 (142 years ago)
English County
--
Greater Manchester
Current Ground
--
Macron Stadium
Ground Location
--
Bolton, England
Club's Owner
--
Eddie Davies
Club Chairman
--
Ken Anderson
Current Manager
--
Phil Parkinson
Current League
--
Legaue One
Last Season
--
Championship, 24th place
(relegated)


HOME COLORS

White & Navy Blue
AWAY COLORS

Black w/Gold Trim
INTERESTING STADIUM FACTS & INFORMATION


MACRON STADIUM
Burnden Way, Horwich, Bolton
Greater Manchester, BL6-6JW England


OPENED: ......... September 1, 1997
SURFACE: ........ Desso GrassMaster
COST: .............. 25 million
CAPACITY: ...... 28,723
RECORD: ......... 28,353 (2003 vs Leicester City)
OWNER: ........... Bolton Wanderers F. C.
OPERATOR: ..... Bolton Wanderers F.C.
FIELD SIZE: ...... 110 x 72 yards (100 x 66 meters)



HOME JERSEY
AWAY JERSEY


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List Of Clubs That Played In England's First Division (All-Time)


Arsenal
Aston Villa
Barnsley
Birmingham City
Blackburn Rovers
Blackpool
Bolton Wanderers
Bournemouth
Bradford City
Bradford Park Avenue
Brentford
Brighton & Hove Albion
Bristol City
Burnley
Bury
Cardiff City
Carlisle United
Charlton Athletic
Chelsea
Coventry City
Crystal Palace
Darwen

Derby County
Everton
Fulham
Glossop
Grimsby Town
Huddersfield Town
Hull City
Ipswich Town
Leeds United
Leicester City
Leyton Orient
Liverpool
Luton Town
Manchester City
Manchester United
Middlesbrough
Millwall
Newcastle United
Northampton Town
Norwich City
Nottingham Forest

Notts County
Oldham Athletic
Oxford United
Portsmouth
Preston North End
Queens Park Rangers
Reading
Sheffield United
Sheffield Wednesday
Southampton
Stoke City
Sunderland
Swansea City
Swindon Town
Tottenham Hotspur
Watford
West Bromwich Albion
West Ham United
Wigan Athletic
Wimbledon
Wolverhampton

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ENGLISH FOOTBALL LEAGUE (First Division)
1991-92
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1932-33
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1918-19
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1891-92
1890-91
1889-90
1888-89

** NOTE ** The 1940-41 thru 1945-46 League Seasons cancelled due to World War II,
while clubs only completed 3 matches each before the 1939-40 Season was cancelled.

** NOTE ** The 1915-16 thru 1918-19 League Seasons cancelled due to World War I.




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